Curriculum, Hall Groat Oil Painting Video DVD Course

Hall Groat Oil Painting Video DVD Course

SERIES #1 
Beginning Painter

Recommended DVD viewing sequence

This viewing sequence will provide the ideal foundation for the beginning painter. One starts by learning the fundamentals, and then gradually progresses to more advanced concepts.

Volume 26: Observing Value

Volume 4: Tools, Practices & Principles

Volumes 1-3: Introduction to Fundamental Phases of Painting

Volume 18: Basic Composition

Volume 5: Basic Color Schemes & Harmonies

Volumes 6-10: Practice Applying the Fundamentals

Volume 13: Tonalism: Edge Control & Atmospheric Space

Volume 17: Light

Volume 16: Fabric

Volume 15: Glass

Volume 14: Metal

Volume 24: Vegetables & Fruit

Volumes 11-12: Floral Forms

Volume 21: Distant Landscape View

Volume 22: Waterfalls & Rocks

Volume 23: Desserts

Volume 25: Rocks, Water and Trees

 


SERIES #2

Advanced Painter

Recommended DVD viewing sequence

This viewing sequence will provide the advanced painter an outstanding overview of
classical observational painting.

Volume 13: Tonalism and Edges

Volume 17: Light

Volume 16: Fabric

Volume 15: Glass

Volume 14: Metal

Volume 24: Vegetables & Fruit

Volumes 11-12: Floral Forms

Volume 21: Distant Landscape View

Volume 22: Waterfalls & Rocks

Volume 20: Ocean

Volume 19: Architecture with Landscape

Volume 23: Desserts

Volume 25: Rocks, Water and Trees

Volume 27: Painting Nocturnes 


PAINTING CLASSES

Hall Groat Art School

Please note: The images of the paintings below are only included within Professor Groat’s manuscript on painting. Excerpts from this manuscript are posted below to offer the student an insight regarding the concepts presented within the instructional DVD series. The links within each section will direct you to sample instructional video clips and the subjects.


Foundation Concepts

Volume 26 – Learn how to Observe Value

In Observing Value – The cube, cylinder & sphere, Hall introduces to the beginning art student the techniques that are essential for accurately observing and painting value relationships. He begins with a detailed demonstration on painting a ten-step, classic linear grayscale, and then applies the chart and concepts he presented on value to painting three geometric forms.

Painting Video Lesson 1

“Studying Your Values First is the Key to Your Success!”

Before you begin to paint, regardless of your subject matter, look hard and see how many value changes you can find that will help you paint your picture. Study how things appear and it can be your key to success in your painting. One example of value change can be seen very easily, yet so often overlooked. A simple telephone pole may appear lighter than the background but the top is often seen very dark against the sky. This may seem like a minor consideration but the whole painting process is based on your ability to get your values right. Notice how most everything you observe appears in this same way. Tree branches may appear light in one part of a painting yet very dark as they reach skyward. A vision I remember as a beginning painter was looking out across Ontario Lake. It was a magnificent discovery to see the horizon line actually reverse itself from one end of the horizon to the other. The water’s edge appeared black at one edge of the horizon and gradually became very light at the other.

Volume 4 – Oil Painting Tools, Practices, and Principles

In Volume 4 DVD Hall demonstrates oil painting tools, practices, and principles, which are essential for learning how to paint in a classical realist oil painting style! The two hours of solid instruction include a concise demonstration on how to specifically mix all 12 of the colors found on the color wheel in a variety of tones, tints and shades, in addition to a presentation on how to successfully use the classical color wheel.  Hall also presents in great depth the exact oil paint colors he uses and how they are strategically arranged on his palette. He then describes in great detail the various types of oil painting brushes that are used by artists, in addition to properly using the traditional palette knife and glass scraper. Also, included is a thorough presentation on professionally stretching and sizing cotton canvas, which includes magnificent close-up details of the most ideal technique for neatly folding canvas corners.

Hall also presents the traditional elements and principles of design, and how concepts such as balance, rhythm, repetition, and scale, serve as the foundation for unity, harmony, variation, hierarchy, and proportion. A dynamic presentation on how the the art element: value, is integral to the overall success of a traditional realist painting is also covered. It’s divided into various chapters for quick and easy navigation to subjects of particular interest to the viewer.

Painting Video Tutorial 2


“Learn the fundamentals of painting before setting

out to consciously make paintings about grand ideas!”


Learning how to oil paint in a classical style requires one to practice observing the world in a completely new way. You have to become a child once again. Instead of looking at apples as just round forms strewn on a tabletop, one must learn how to see them in terms of both color and value within the space that they rest. This empty space that surrounds the apples, believe it or not, has a unique color and value, too, and must be observed as carefully as the fruit itself.

Learning how to paint well and the process of becoming an artist are completely different. Good paintings are about mastery of craft; whereas a fine artist has to achieve a balance between mastery of craft and the idea behind the painting: its content! Don’t bother trying to be an artist in the beginning; first learn the fundamentals of painting before setting out to consciously make paintings about grand ideas. The simplest subjects often make the most profound statements. It is better to make a small painting about a big idea, rather than a monumental painting that expresses nothing. If you study nature daily through your paintings, there will be great truth in your work. What you see in the world provides the answers.


Introduction to Beginning Painting Technqiues

Volume 1 – Learn how to Paint Lemons, Teacup, Ballet Slippers, Pocket watch, Radishes

In Volume #1 oil painting dvd he presents five comprehensive demonstrations, offering nearly two hours of solid instruction. The oil painting video lessons included are of compositions involving: three lemons, radishes, ballet slippers, railroad conductor’s pocket watch, and teacup and saucer.

Such topics are covered as establishing background variation and movement, accents and cast shadows, and realizing the primary and secondary planes of the motif. Each of the five painting demonstration dvds is divided into phases with clearly stated topic headings that correspond to the phases outlined below.

Class Lesson 3 – Lemons

Class Lesson 3 – Radishes

Class Lesson 3 – Ballet Slippers

 Phase #1 – The Undertone: Simple Sketch and Basic Value Relationships

The initial brush marks made on the canvas must suggest in simple terms the essence of the subject. One must learn to perceive the still life as a single mass, formed by a group of interconnected shapes, no matter how many objects are included within the composition. Oftentimes squinting with one’s eyes, barely open, will reduce the subject to simple light and dark patterns. Through letting just a little bit of light to enter one’s eyes the subject will appear as a simplified spot of value without detail. Study the particular contour of this single mass, in relation to the surrounding space— this is the essence of your subject. In the painting of the teapot with the peach and apricot (Plate 10) carefully study the irregular shapes of background and foreground. The big spot of background negative space (or counter form) is as important as the still life objects themselves, and must be given equal consideration.

Raw Umber Undertone

Plate 10

Using a large bristle brush, establish the basic composition and main value spots, including low-key, middle value, high-key areas, with a transparent undertone of warm or cool neutral. With still life painting I either use a warm neutral, such as Raw Umber, or a cool neutral, consisting of Ultramarine Blue, Raw Umber and a touch of white. Combining warm umber with cool blue is not as bold looking as a pure umber undertone and often appears more ethereal and moody. A good rule of thumb to follow is work with a cool neutral when painting a warm subject, and a warm neutral with a cool subject. Be creative and explore undertone variations to see how they interact with different subjects. In the painting of the bread and water (Plate 12) the warm umber and cool blue appear softer and vague, which works well for water.

Raw Umber Undertone

Plate 11

On occasions I will use the pile of muddy paint that is scraped up on my palette from the prior painting, instead of Raw Umber. During the course of a painting, I periodically scrape my glass palette with a standard glass scrapper and end up with a big pile of very dull, grayed paint. Depending on what colors I used before, this pile of mud will be either slightly warm or cool, and works well as an undertone for subjects that are lighter in value. You may either sketch the mass out with a bristle brush, using a transparent undertone and then thinly scumble the umber within the lines, or block it in with simple scumbles from the center outward to form the contour of the mass. Explore both approaches!

After the placement of the basic mass has been suggested, the individual objects may be softly defined at the points where they overlap and meet the tabletop. Thinly applied brushstrokes may be used to indicate the shadows of the forms, and cast shadows.

During this initial stage a paper towel can be used to wipe away back to the original white of the canvas or panel, and to also help with modeling form through smearing with the crumbled towel a transparent layer of paint over the surface. This is similar to the technique used to rub a broad tone of charcoal on to paper. You may need to attempt this technique several times before the composition and scale of the forms are the way in which you want them to look.

The undertone should also be used in the background to further define and adjust the contour of the forms (diagram 11). Notice how the handle on the teapot returns to the white of the canvas. Placing a small amount of linseed oil on to the paper towel helps remove the entire undertone when wiping away areas in order to define shapes.

Warm Cool Undertone

Plate 12

Volume 2 – Beginning Lessons in Painting Grapes, Baseball and Eggs

The demonstrations included are of compositions involving: a classic American baseball with all of its intricate red stitching, three luminous white eggs set against a rich, dark background, and a lovely grouping of violet grapes resting within a ornate gold vintage creamer!

Painting Techniques Lesson 4 – Baseball

Painting Techniques Lesson 4 – Eggs

egg-chart

LINK to  “How to Paint a Baseball” – Step-by-Step Guide:

Selecting a Subject to Paint !

One must get into the habit of studying their surroundings in order to discover desirable subjects to paint. The most engaging motif often presents itself during ordinary, day-to-day life, when you are not actually trying to decide on what to paint. Begin by choosing a subject that you find aesthetically appealing and inspiring, one that perhaps evokes memories or has a quality about it that catches your eyes. Ordinary, mundane objects often reveal extraordinary qualities, such as a mysterious glimmer of light or reflection on a metallic surface. In some instances, the particular mood of the space that surrounds the motif may be what attracts you to the subject. The subtle tonal transitions within cast shadows and the dark, mysterious background may end up being more visually engaging than the symbolic meaning or story behind the subject.

 

Volume 3 – Beginning Techniques in Painting Oreo cookies with Milk and a Pocket watch

Painting Techniques Lesson 5 – Oreo Cookies

Painting Video Lesson 5 – Pocket watch

Phase #2 – Surrounding Space: Background and Foreground

Once the basic forms in the composition are suggested with simplified spots of value, then general areas of color are indicated in both the foreground and background. I find that painting the background first helps define the forms and immediately adds a compelling sense of depth that assists with deciding how to paint the actual objects. My college students often ask me “Professor Groat, I want to paint the objects first instead.” I say, “Go ahead and try this out”, and most of the time they end up with a stiff looking, overly graphic piece. Through the years, I’ve discovered that having the students paint the background first, lends itself to a more naturalistic looking painting by forcing them study the surrounding space and objects equally, rather than perceiving the background as a mere backdrop that is painted in as an afterthought towards the end. Painting the negative space first also places focus on the contours of the forms through assisting the beginning student in addressing the quality of edges from the beginning. I have to admit, that once and a while I paint the objects before the background to mix things up and explore, however find that the other way usually lends itself to a more successful outcome.

Most classical work is based on dark against light values and striking warm and cool color relationships. The dramatic light and shadow patterns seen in my work are connected with what is defined as “Chiaroscuro”, which is a classical Italian term for “light-dark”. Chiaroscuro was invented during the 15th century Italian Renaissance, and perfected by the 16th century Baroque painters. Most of my still life work is based on bold dark and light patterns, and placing warm and cool tones side-by-side.

With the painting of the teapot and the warm peach and apricot (plate 13) a cool dark background offered an appealing contrast by defining the forms in space. As the piece developed, a double complementary harmony emerged, consisting of blue against orange and red resonating with green.

A good rule of thumb for initially painting the background and foreground areas is to slightly vary the value, color intensity, and hue from one side to the other to add visual interest and a sense of movement. In the apricot and peach piece the value and temperature was varied in the very beginning; the upper right appears warmer and a bit darker compared to the left. Working with a larger sized bristle brush early on, forces one to think in general terms and simplify large areas.

Background Space Blue

Plate 13


Volume 18 – Classical Composition

In Classical Composition Hall introduces various traditional models for composing objects into visually compelling arrangements. Through composing and painting a variety of subjects, he presents the symmetrical ,asymmetrical, hourglass, and pyramid formations, along with the “. Included within the two-hour DVD are stunning close-up shots of his compositional sketching technique, studies through the viewfinder, and views of his studio as he discusses his paintings at different stages.

Arranging the Objects into a Composition

Oil Painting Lesson 6 – Classical Composition

The composition of your painting is the most important component. One can paint with tremendous virtuosity; however without a well-balanced and unified composition the painting won’t keep the viewer’s attention for more than a few seconds. For many painters it is the most elusive and intimidating step in the creative process to tackle. A good composition is like a well-organized kitchen, where there is logic for how the appliances are strategically positioned around the room. Why do people place the refrigerator along the wall and not directly in the middle of the kitchen, or the toaster on top of the counter and not on the floor where someone could trip and fall on their face? In most cases, well-composed rooms are formed in ways that reflect their function, allowing people to freely move throughout the living space. In the same way, the viewer of a painting should be able to rhythmically move throughout the picture from object to the next way – the composition should be inviting to enter. An unbalanced and non-unified painting will appear weak and unappealing; no matter how well you paint it! For some artists, the ability to set up engaging compositions is a natural gift, and for others, it requires countless hours of trial and error. There exist many schools of thought regarding the art of composition; however we will focus on classical methods that have been proven successful through the centuries.


Volume 5 – Color Schemes and Harmonies

American artist, Hall Groat II, in his unique instructional DVD series demonstrates traditional oil painting color schemes and harmonies. In volume #5 he presents two hours of fully narrated demonstrations that introduce in great depth six unique color schemes and harmonies, including monochromatic, analogous, complementary,cool/warm, triadic and the tetrad harmony. In each of the demonstrations Hall paints a different California Bartlett pear and applies the six unique color schemes to six different pear paintings! He discusses the fundamentals of simple color harmonies, opposing color harmonies and classic balanced harmonies, and reveals the pros and cons of each! Each demonstration includes spectacular close-up shots of various colors being mixed together on the palette, and how the saturation and value of the colors are altered through both cool, achromatic neutrals and chromatic neutrals.

Oil Painting Lesson 7 – Color Schemes and Harmonies


Practice Applying the Fundamentals

Volume 6 – Painting Apples

 Phase #3 – Cast Shadows Opposite Light Source and Front Light of Form and Accents

Through adding cast shadows the painting will begin to take on a sense of depth and visual weight and help define the still life objects within the composition. (Plate 14) It’s important to anchor the objects down, preventing them from appearing as if they are floating in space; and also give them a convincing feeling of volume and visual weight. Using a medium sized brush, indicate bold accents at the points where the objects meet the surface they are resting on. These marks may be stated with the phase 1 umber undertone or any dark value that is muted and not too intense. It’s helpful to make the value of the cast shadow similar to the value of the shadow of the subject to make the area read as unified and harmonious. Working with “shared value” also enhances the sensation of atmosphere and mood. Later in the painting, the edges of the cast shadows may be softened and diffused to appear more natural.

Suggest Light on Forms

Plate 14

Oil Painting Lesson 8 – Painting Apples-
Applying the Fundamentals

Notes on Painting Cast Shadows

Get into the habit of studying the subtleties you see within cast shadows, such as gentle value gradations and temperature transitions. Your light source, along with the color and value of the subject matter, all play an important role in forming the appearance of the cast shadow. Study how the warmth from the red-orange of the apricot permeates into the neutral gray-blue of the cast shadow, enhancing the sense of atmosphere and adding mood (diagram 9). The edges of the cast shadows should be softened as it diffuses outward away from the subject. It’s important to closely observe the relationship between the hard and soft edges of the cast shadow.

Apricot painting

Diagram 9

(Detail) Silver Bowl with Apricots, 8”x10” Oil on canvas 200

apple_chart

 

Volume 7 – Cherries

Oil Painting Lesson 9 – Painting Cherries
Applying the Fundamentals

Volume 8 – Red Bartlett Pear

Oil Painting Lesson 10 – Painting Red Bartlett Pear
Applying the Fundamentals

howtopaintpears

Volume 9 – Tangerines

Oil Painting Lesson 11 – Painting Tangerines
Applying the Fundamentals

Volume 10 – Strawberries

Oil Painting Lesson 12 – Painting Strawberries
Applying the Fundamentals


Tonalism: Edge Control & Atmospheric Space

Volume 13 – Tonalist Painting

Tonalism is rooted in the French Barbizon movement, which emphasized atmosphere and shadow. The Tonalist style employs a distinctive technique by the use of color’s middle values as opposed to stronger contrast and high chroma. Resulting in a understated and compelling overall effect. The tonalist subject matter is never entirely apparent; their is no effort to communicate a message or narrate a story. Instead of relating a story, each sensitively chosen color, composition, and line is arranged to create an intriguing visual poem.

Oil Painting Lesson 13 – Tonalism

Edge Control & Atmospheric Space

Shared Value and Lost and Found Edges

Many artists describe “shared value” as a process of “loosing and finding edges”. Varying the quality of edges is an important aspect of suggesting naturalistic illusions.
The edges of forms will appear sharp, soft or completely diffused based on the quality of light and respective values of the neighboring forms and surrounding space.

Squint, so your eyes are barely open allowing only a small amount of light to enter, and what you see will appear as simplified light and dark patterns. Allow your eyes to navigate across and around the contours of the forms to determine in what sections the value-key of the subject is similar to the background. Where the values appear similar the edge may be softened or diffused, and where the values are equal the edge may disappear completely.

Dissolving Edges and Forms

Softening or completely dissolving the edges of parts of the subject contributes to the overall sense of atmospheric space, mystery and mood. Realizing form in this manner also mimics the way in which we see the world. Try this as an experiment: completely focus your attention on the exact center of your hand and notice how your peripheral vision becomes fuzzy and blurred. Humans, unlike a camera, do not have the capability to perceive all edges as sharp simultaneously. We see the world in continual motion since time does not stand still. Even when we think of a memory within in our “mind’s eye” there is a sense of movement to this imaginary vision.


Light

Volume 17 – Painting Light

In this DVD Hall introduces several classical approaches for suggesting brilliant, shimmering light. Included within the two-hour oil painting video lessons are stunning close-up shots of Hall’s classical brushwork, color mixing techniques, in addition to views of his studio as he discusses his paintings of light at different stages.

Oil Painting Lesson 14 – Painting Light

Phase #4: Painting Light Striking the Form

Light enhances the three-dimensional illusion of the subject, adds drama and defines the planes that make the form appear to recede back into space. In classical paintings from the 15th-19th century it’s impressive when the image in the painting seems so life-like that you feel like you can touch it. The “form light” is the area on the subject that is facing towards and illuminated by the light source. In curvilinear forms such as the lemon, (plate 8) the light will slightly gradate around the curvature of the form. As the light moves around the form, it becomes both cooler in temperature and less intense.

The temperature of the front light is affected by the color of the subject and type of light source. When natural daylight is used to illuminate the subject the front light will
appear cool and bluish, and when using an incandescent or tungsten light bulb it will look warm. Most light bulbs radiant a yellow-orange cast, however color correct bulbs (full spectrum light) will approximate natural light and appear cooler.

Before proceeding to paint the form light, wipe away with a paper towel the entire transparent undertone back to the initial white of the canvas or ground, in the areas where the light is striking. This will prevent high-key saturated colors, such as yellow or orange from becoming dulled and less intense looking when painting the light. When working with darker colors such as blue or green this is not as critical.

When suggesting the light striking the forms, apply the paint thickly and with simple, bold, overlapping strokes. Appling horizontal and vertical geometric strokes with a long flat or filbert brush works well. Just avoid applying the paint in little pointillist dot-like dabs, and instead, work towards interweaving the strokes together like the straw of a basket. Take note of how raw and crude the paint looks on the right sides of the three forms (plate 14), and how a few large brushstrokes define the entire light side of the teapot lid. At this point, don’t blend; just layer the paint like if you were applying peanut butter on to a slice of bread. Make it look thick and gooey! Work with large, simple brushstrokes through using the biggest paintbrush you can handle. With this particular 8×10 in. piece I used a #10 flat bristle brush to block in all of the lights, working with both the length and width of the bristle wedge. Later on in the painting, these initial bold spots may be blended softly around the curvature of the forms into the shadows to appear more natural looking.

Lemons on plate

Plate 8 (Detail)

Lemons on Sterling Silver Plate

8”x10” Oil on canvas 2009

DIRECTIONAL LIGHT

Directional light stems from a specific slight source such as a lamp, candle or the sun, illuminating one side of a motif, whereas Ambient or Resonant Light is light that is very general and comes from all directions.

directionall ight

Lemons on Sterling Silver Plate

8”x10” Oil on canvas 2009


Fabric Folds

Volume 16 – Painting Fabric

In this dvd Hall introduces several classical approaches for realizing the dynamic form of fabric, through painting elegant sections of white, red and blue cloth.

Oil Painting Lesson 15 – Fabric Forms

Phase #5: Painting Shadows of Forms

When working with one directional light source the form shadow will undoubtedly be a darker value compared to the light side of the subject. The degree of darkness is dependent upon the intensity of the light source. A light that is positioned closer to the subject will be more concentrated compared to a light that further away and diffused. Also, if there exists a secondary light source on the opposite side, such as a window, the shadow side will not look as dark, and will appear cooler, especially when using a warm light source.

In strict classical painting the shadow of the form is usually painted before the light side. Through years of teaching, I’ve discovered that beginning painters often have a difficult time keeping the colors on the light side looking clean and bright. The students will paint the shadow side of the subject before the light side, and end up muddling the lights somehow. The lights end up looking muted and not alive with intensity. After painting the shadows, one must either clean their paintbrush very well or use a second brush to paint the light side with.

I recommend for people just beginning, to paint the light side before the shadow of the form. If the lights are not kept clean and bright, the illusion of light and shadow will be very difficult to achieve, and ultimately the painting may lack a sense of form and appear as if it was painted in the dark. After learning the basics of painting through using strong light and shadow patterns, then one may try depicting the subject within the shadows or without a definitive light source. This is certainly a challenge; therefore why not just first progress though the stepping-stones.

The shadow of the form should be painted thinner and quieter compared to the thick and bold light side. Work with the same large-sized brush that was used to paint the lights, however be certain that it’s absolutely clean, or use a second one. Before painting the shadow areas study its value through squinting like before, to simplify what you see. In most cases, the value of the background right next to the shadow will be quite similar, and in some cases identical. In plate 15, note how the value of the left side of the teapot spout is only slightly darker compared to the background. Squint so your eyes barely open and the values will appear the same. Now, where the left edge of the teapot meets the background the values are identical, however the curve of the teapot lid is a bit warmer compared to the background. A subtle contrast in the temperature of the tone is the only thing that distinguishes them.

plate15

Plate 15


Painting Glass

Volume 15 – Painting Glass

In this video lesson Hall introduces various classical approaches for suggesting the illusions of transparent and reflective glass, and paints a shimmering martini glass, an elegant ivory ashtray from Maxime’s Restaurant in Paris, and a lovely Waterford crystal glass filled with water.

Oil Painting Lesson 16 – Painting Glass

Phase #6: Restate the Contour of the Forms

At this point every area of the canvas has been painted. The building blocks of the subject are represented with simple light and dark spots of color, and are contrasted against the background. The initial phases of the painting require one to focus on the basic shapes of the subject, which often results in a vague and less accurate contour of what we are actually seeing. The bold shapes of color that have been placed down on the canvas are more less an approximation of what the subject looks like and not very accurate. The edges may now be restated to reflect the specific contour of the subject more accurately. Using a smaller brush such as a #2 or #3, use some of the tonality from the background to sketch around the outside of the forms, and perhaps carve away a bit of the edge or even add on. Essentially, the tone that was used in the background before is used to re-shape the contour the subject, requiring one to consider the quality of the edges. The edge closest to the light source will be sharper compared to the edges moving into the shadows. When the edges within the shadows begin to appear lost this is called “sharing values”. Basically the value of the edge of the form will look the same as the background space right next to it. Spend some time experimenting with merging small segments of the contour of a form with the background through sharing values, which will help unify composition and make the objects look more naturalistic.

plate16

Plate 16

Shared Value and Lost and Found Edges

Many artists describe “shared value” as a process of “loosing and finding edges”. Varying the quality of edges is an important aspect of suggesting naturalistic illusions.
The edges of forms will appear sharp, soft or completely diffused based on the quality of light and respective values of the neighboring forms and surrounding space.

Squint, so your eyes are barely open allowing only a small amount of light to enter, and what you see will appear as simplified light and dark patterns. Allow your eyes to navigate across and around the contours of the forms to determine in what sections the value-key of the subject is similar to the background. Where the values appear similar the edge may be softened or diffused, and where the values are equal the edge may disappear completely.

Dissolving Edges and Forms

Softening or completely dissolving the edges of parts of the subject contributes to the overall sense of atmospheric space, mystery and mood. Realizing form in this manner also mimics the way in which we see the world. Try this as an experiment: completely focus your attention on the exact center of your hand and notice how your peripheral vision becomes fuzzy and blurred. Humans, unlike a camera, do not have the capability to perceive all edges as sharp simultaneously. We see the world in continual motion since time does not stand still. Even when we think of a memory within in our “mind’s eye” there is a sense of movement to this imaginary vision.


Painting Metal

Volume 14 – Painting Metallic Surfaces

In this video Hall introduces various classical approaches for creating the illusion of reflective surfaces, and paints a sterling silver teapot, gold Christmas ornanment, pocket watch and silver bowl.

Oil Painting Lesson 17 – Painting Metal

Phase #7: Develop the Secondary Planes of Each Form

Begin to model forms by painting secondary planes over top of primary planes. The area where two large planar strokes meet is the area where the secondary planes should be suggested. These are executed with a brush that is typically smaller than the one used to block in the larger planes, and are what gives the form a convincing illusion of volume.

planes of form


Painting Vegetables and Fruit

Volume 24 – Tomatoes, Peaches and Pepper

In this DVD Hall reinforces the twelve important phases, such as “form light and shadow” that are the foundation of classical observational painting, in addition to demonstrating how to suggest details and highlights. Featured are three 8″x10″ demonstration painting lessons, including an elegant cluster of three ripe red tomatoes, a single yellow pepper with silver cup, along with a group of three luminous peaches resting on a blue cloth.

Oil Painting Lesson 18 – Vegetables and Fruit


Phase #8: Suggest Details

The key concept at this stage is “suggest.” If details are overstated and not subtly integrated the painting will look unnatural and stiff. Oftentimes details have to be suggested and then restated several times before they actually begin to look right. Within the instructional DVD series you will notice that I often soften or diffuse a detailed paint stroke with my finger, pinky or thumb in order to visually integrate it into the surrounding space. There are also instances where I use a soft synthetic sable brush to softly pat, tap or gently press down on top of the paint to make it shimmer or blur either an entire brushstroke or just a small section of the painted mark. If the edges of detailed paint strokes are not suggested correctly they may end up appearing fragmented or disconnected from the subject.

Phase #9: Restate Cast Shadows & Accents

Restate cast shadows and accents more specifically through suggesting both the cool and warm areas that exist within the cast shadow. When restating these areas closely observe the manner in which the edges change from hard to a softer edge as the shadow extends outward from the motif.

Phase #10:Reflective Light

Suggest rim light/reflective light (if it’s present) along the edge of the shadow side of the motif.

Phase #11: Background Variation

Vary background value and temperature to suggest light and movement. This is completed in relation to the value and color of the motif. A scumble and modular brushstroke can be intermixed to add visual interest through variation.

Phase #12: Highlights

The areas of the motif that are closest to the light source will appear the highest key. These areas can be painted with a smaller brush with more of an impasto application of paint, using pure white or white mixed with a tinge of yellow or orange to add warmth. Impasto means that the paint is applied more thickly, without thinning it with linseed oil or some other vehicle such as turpentine. Highlights are meant to be the finishing touches that enhance the sense of volume and illusion of the motif and sense of light.


Floral Forms

Volume 11 – Painting Roses

In this video Hall paints a beautiful bouquet of red roses.

Oil Painting Lesson 19 – Roses

Volume 12 – Painting Lilies

In this DVD Hall paints a beautiful bouquet of white lilies in a tall crystal vase.

Oil Painting Lesson 20 – Lillies


Landscape Painting

Landscape painting is very liberating, allowing the painter to explore a more spontaneous approach to making marks on a canvas. In the simplest terms: to paint a landscape is to paint a “box of air” — whereby varying sized and formed atmospheric brush marks lead the viewer back into space towards the horizon line.

Volume 21: Distant Landscape View

In the Irish Landscape painting video, Volume 21, Hall introduces the tradition of landscape painting through a breathtaking view of the rolling hills and water of County Cork in Southern Ireland. He paints the classic view on an 11″x14″ canvas in his studio through directly observing an 8″x10″ plein-air piece that was completed while looking across the lush landscape of Cork, Ireland. Included within the two-hour landscape painting video are visually striking shots of Hall’s traditional landscape painting techniques and views of his studio as he discusses his paintings at different stages.

Oil Painting Lesson 21 – Painting Ireland

Volume 22: Waterfalls & Rocks

In Painting Waterfalls-Volume 22, Hall introduces the tradition of landscape painting through a breathtaking view of Chittenango Waterfalls located in Chittenango, NY. He paints this classic view on an 11″x14″ canvas, in front of a romantic fire, directly observing an 8″x10″ plein-air piece that was completed on location while looking up at the majestic upstate, NY scene the month before.

Oil Painting Lesson 22 – Painting Waterfalls

Volume 20: Ocean

Hall Groat Sr. teaches the basics of painting the ocean waves.

Oil Painting Lesson 24 – Painting the Ocean

Volume 19: Architecture with Landscape

In Painting Florence Hall introduces the tradition of landscape painting through a breathtaking view of Florence, Italy. He paints the classic view on an 11″x14″ canvas in his studio through directly observing an 8″x10″ plein-air piece that was completed while looking down over the Arno river high above Florence.

Oil Painting Lesson 25 – Painting Architecture within Landscape

Volume 25: Rocks, Water and Trees

In Volume #25: PAINTING THE ADIRONDACKS Hall introduces various landscape painting concepts and techniques that are essential to painting a classic scene with water, rocks and trees. He focuses on establishing the underlying structure and composition, along with developing a sense of form, space and light filtering through the trees. One is able to see firsthand how he uses both bristle and sable brushes to realize a variety of textured surfaces, in addition to contrasting warm and cool tonalities to suggest movement.

Oil Painting Lesson 26- Painting Streams, Rocks and Moving Water

Volume 27: Painting Nocturnes

In Volume #27 oil painting dvd: Painting Nocturnes–The Brooklyn Bridge, Hall teaches the beginning art student the techniques that are essential for creating dazzling nocturnal cityscapes. Prior to painting the main Brooklyn Bridge piece, he discusses five of his larger nocturnes and then teaches several foundation color theory concepts. Hall then moves on to the main demonstration painting, where he instructs one how to establish the foundation architectural and landscape forms, mix warm and cool colors, and then illustrates in great detail how the vast array of colored city lights are actually made to appear luminous within the darkness.

Oil Painting Lesson 27 – Painting Nocturnes – Night Scenes


Food Textures

Volume 23: Desserts

In Desserts – volume #23 Hall introduces several classical techniques for painting a variety of delicious baked foods. Featured are five 11″x14″ demonstrations, including a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, French cruller donuts, half-moon and chocolate chip cookies and a slice of apple pie on a plate with a fork. Within the two-hour DVD are stunning close-up shots of Hall’s classical oil painting techniques and views of his studio as he discusses his paintings at different stages.

Oil Painting Lesson 28 – Painting Desserts

 

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